Collection Artwork
album cover for “Cosmic Tones for Mental Therapy” by Sun Ra and his Myth Science Arkestra
1967, second printing c. 1970
offset print on paper
Sun Ra Arkestra (born Chicago, Illinois, mid-1950s)
El Saturn Records (born Chicago, Illinois, 1957)
paper size: 14 x 14 in.
Gift of John Corbett & Terri Kapsalis
2017.6.12

Object Label

On the cover of the Sun Ra LP We Travel the Space Ways, the natural, musical, and extra-terrestrial realms are brought together in one place. A red UFO flies across the sky, a reminder of Sun Ra’s self-proclaimed extra-terrestrial citizenship and perhaps a visual allusion to his 1974 film, Space is the Place, in which Ra proposes to create a black nation in outer space. As the UFO flies by, baby-blue ocean waves crash into giant piano keys on the shore, sweeping the keys, musical notes, and a crash cymbal out to sea. Red hands stick out above the water, grasping musical instruments. Is this a literal reflection of Ra’s philosophy that musicians should play with their spirit and totally immerse themselves in music, with waves of water representing sound waves? Or perhaps these waves invoke the physically palpable, unstoppable, and sometimes even dangerous character of music—vividly depicted early in Space is the Place, when Sun Ra’s piano playing somehow triggers the destruction of a night club.
—David Rivera ’20

From the exhibition: Art Forms of Dimensions Tomorrow (April 13 – April 16, 2017)

Ongoing Research

Research on our collection is ongoing. If you have resources you’d like to share, please contact Associate Curator Rebecca McNamara.

Learn more

Art Forms of Dimensions Tomorrow
Exhibition
On Sun Ra Adam Tinkle talks to Ephraim Asili, Chris Corsano, Joe McPhee, Kamau Amu Patton, and Matana Roberts
Interview
Adam Tinkle on Working with the Sun Ra Archive
Essay
i
Pattern by Erin Barry ’16
Inspired by the exhibition The Jewel Thief
The Tang Pattern Project celebrates the Museum’s 20th anniversary. Organized by Head of Design Jean Tschanz-Egger, past and current Tang Design Interns created patterns inspired by the Museum’s exhibition and event history.