Collection Artwork
Jonathan Seliger (born New York, New York, 1955)
Home
1996
oil, alkyd, acrylic, modeling paste on canvas
installed size: 86 1/2 x 30 1/2 x 40 1/2 in.
Gift of Patti and Frank Kolodny
2008.12.7

Installation views

Object Label

Since the mid-1990s, Jonathan Seliger has meticulously created sculptures that mimic mass-produced consumer goods, such as newspapers, shower caps, milk cartons, and shopping bags. At first glance, many of Seliger’s works can be mistaken for the actual object; however, he often alters the proportions and attributes of the original object so that the sculpture exists in a liminal place, at once recognizable yet eerily bizarre.

Seliger is perhaps best known for his works that begin as carefully planned paintings, which he folds and glues into three dimensions. More recently, he has created works in aluminum, bronze, and stainless steel, sprayed with automotive enamels. While Seliger’s interest in mass-produced, everyday objects has a precedent in the work of the Pop artists, his focus resonates on a more human level. His sculptures investigate our personal connections with the objects around us, touching on issues of class, consumption, and value.

From the exhibition: One Work (January 25 – June 1, 2014)

Ongoing Research

Research on our collection is ongoing. If you have resources you’d like to share, please contact Associate Curator Rebecca McNamara.

Learn more

One Work
Exhibition
Opener 1
Jonathan Seliger: Floor Model
Exhibition
Jonathan Seliger on Home, 1996
Video
Interview
i
Pattern by Erin Barry ’16
Inspired by the exhibition The Jewel Thief
The Tang Pattern Project celebrates the Museum’s 20th anniversary. Organized by Head of Design Jean Tschanz-Egger, past and current Tang Design Interns created patterns inspired by the Museum’s exhibition and event history.